Friday, December 11, 2015

Review: The Game

If you're a frequent reader of Dilbert's Blog, you're familiar with Scott Adams' moist robot hypothesis. Basically, the theory is that we're all robots that can be programmed with external stimuli, and led to do things that our rational minds wouldn't let us do.

The Game is a book about taking this hypothesis to the next level, and applying and developing methods for men to meet, amaze, and bed women in a short amount of time. Well, that's what the advertising copy would have you believe. In reality, the book is about the community (known as the PUA community, or the Pick-Up-Artists) that not only builds (probably more than one) internet forum exchanging such techniques, as well as running workshops to train men in these techniques.

Don't ask me whether these techniques work. Neil Strauss says they do, and it's entirely feasible that they do, though apparently by the end of his run, the PUA community had so rampaged through the LA community that he lived in that most women had already been approached by those techniques and were therefore immune to further activities by PUAs. (I found that really amusing!) Strauss however, tried this technique on Britney Spears, and apparently it works even on celebrities.

Since most of the book is about the politics and social interaction within the community itself, it reads like a journalistic account of the lifestyle behind the PUAs. It's full of neurotic people, which naturally makes much interaction really tedious, making you wonder why he puts up with them. Since Strauss was a journalist for the Rolling Stone, it also meant he got massive exposure to artists/musicians going through crazy times. (Courtney Love appears frequently in the book)

There were several little gems in the book that made such great reading that I highlighted them:
The reason I was here—the reason Sweater and Extramask were also here—was that our parents and our friends had failed us. They had never given us the tools we needed to become fully effective social beings. (Kindle Loc 420-421)
 The problem with being a pickup artist is that there are concepts like sincerity, genuineness, trust, and connection that are important to women. And all the techniques that are so effective in beginning a relationship violate every principle necessary to maintaining one. (Kindle Loc. 4387-89)
 A side effect of sarging is that it can lowers one’s opinion of the opposite sex. You see too much betrayal, lying, and infidelity. If a woman has been married three years or more, you come to learn that she’s usually easier to sleep with than a single woman. If a woman has a boyfriend, you learn that you have a better chance of fucking her the night you meet her than getting her to return a phone call later. Women, you eventually realize, are just as bad as men—they’re just better at hiding it. (Kindle Loc. 6258-62)
 I picked up the book on a $0.99 Kindle deal on Black Friday. It's definitely provided great entertainment for that. Recommended.
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